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You are here: FRIAS Fellows Fellows 2016/17 Prof. Dr. Shaul Mukamel

Prof. Dr. Shaul Mukamel

Every year, approximately 50 Fellows are invited to work on their projects at FRIAS for 2 to 12 months in an intellectually stimulating environment. Fellows that have already been at FRIAS before can return to FRIAS for 2 to 6 weeks within the framework of the Alumni Programme, for example in order to finish a project. Furthermore, junior and senior researchers are regularly invited as guest researchers.

Schätz

Our Research Focus profited enormously from the international team of Fellows and guest researchers at FRIAS.

Prof. Dr. Tobias Schätz, ERC Consolidator Grant 2015, Research Focus Quantum Transport 2014/15

University of California
Chemistry
External Senior Fellow
June - July 2015, October 2015

Room 01 022
Phone +49 (0)761-203 97412
Fax +49 (0)761-203 97451

CV

Shaul Mukamel, currently the Chancellor Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Irvine, received his Ph.D. in 1976 from Tel Aviv University. Following postdoctoral appointments at MIT and the University of California, Berkeley, he has held faculty positions at Rice University, the Weizmann Institute, and the University of Rochester. He is the recipient of the Sloan, Dreyfus, Guggenheim, and Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist award, the OSA Lippincort Award, the APS Plyler Award for Molecular Spectroscopy, Hamburg Prize for Theoretical Physics, and the Lamb Award for Laser Science and Quantum Optics. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. His interests focus on developing computational techniques for the design of novel ultrafast laser pulse sequences for probing electronic and vibrational dynamics in molecules. Biophysical applications include folding and dynamical fluctuations in proteins , hydrogen bonding, long-range electron and energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes, and signatures of chirality. Other areas are attosecond x-ray spectroscopy, excitons in semiconductor nanostructures, many-body effects in quantum optics. He is the author of over 650 publications in scientific journals and the textbook, Principles of Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy (Oxford University Press, 1995).

 

Selected Publications

  • "Suppression of Population transport and Control of Exciton Distributions by Entangled Photons ", F. Schlawin, K.E. Dorfman, B.P. Fingerhut, and S. Mukamel. Nature Communications, 4:1782:DOI:10.1038/ncomms2802 (2013).
  • "Multidimensional Attosecond Resonant X-ray Spectroscopy of Molecules; Lessons from the Optical Regime", J. Biggs, D. Healion, Y. Zhang, and S. Mukamel. Ann Rev Phys Chem, 64, 101-127 (2013).
  • "Watching Energy Transfer in Metalloporphyrin Heterodimers Using X-ray Raman Spectroscopy ", J.D. Biggs, Y. Zhang, D. Healion, and S. Mukamel. PNAS, 110, 15597-15601 (2013)
  • Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy with Entangled Light; Enhanced Resolution and Pathway Selection", K. Dorfman, F. Schlawin, and S. Mukamel. dx.doi.org/10.1021/jz501124a | J. Phys. Chem. Lett (2014)
  • "Multidimensional Spectroscopy with Entangled Light: Loop vs. Ladder Delay Scanning Protocols", K.E. Dorfman and S. Mukamel New J. Phys. 16, 033013 (2014)

 

FRIAS Research Project

New Directions in Multidimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Photosynthetic Complexes and Proteins with Classical Optical Fields and Entangled Photons; Theoretical and Simulation Studies

 

Coherent two dimensional (2D) optical spectroscopic techniques use femtosecond laser pulses to excite the vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom of molecules and watch for correlated events taking place during two (or more) controlled time intervals. Theoretical studies will focus on the design of new pulse sequences and developing computational methods for the analysis of these signals.  Simulations that demonstrate how energy- transfer and charge-separation pathways in photosynthetic antennae and reaction centers may be revealed by these signals will be carried out. The dynamics of protein folding and aggregation will be investigated using 2D techniques in the UV and the infrared.  Extensions to spectroscopy of single molecules with time and frequency gated fluorescence of photoelectron detection will be explored.  Multidimensional signals obtained in response to entangled photons by varying the parameters of the photon functions will be predicted.  Entangled photons offer an unusual combination of bandwidths and temporal resolution as well as the control over quantum pathways of matter, not possible by classical beams. Focused attention will be devoted to the interplay of photon and matter entanglement using techniques of Quantum Information.