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You are here: FRIAS Fellows Fellows 2016/17 Prof. Dr. Michael Stolz

Prof. Dr. Michael Stolz

Every year, approximately 50 Fellows are invited to work on their projects at FRIAS for 2 to 12 months in an intellectually stimulating environment. Fellows that have already been at FRIAS before can return to FRIAS for 2 to 6 weeks within the framework of the Alumni Programme, for example in order to finish a project. Furthermore, junior and senior researchers are regularly invited as guest researchers.

Schätz

Our Research Focus profited enormously from the international team of Fellows and guest researchers at FRIAS.

Prof. Dr. Tobias Schätz, ERC Consolidator Grant 2015, Research Focus Quantum Transport 2014/15

University of Bern
Medieval Studies
External Senior Fellow
October 2014 - January 2015

CV

Michael Stolz was born in 1960 in Munich (Germany). He studied German and French literature in Munich, Poitiers (France), and Bern (Switzerland), where he obtained his PhD (1993) and finished his habilitation thesis (2000). He was assistant lecturer in Bern (1988–1995, 1998–2001), visiting fellow in Oxford, St Edmund Hall (UK, 1995–1998), assistant professor in Basle (Switzerland, 2001–2005), and  professor (W2) in Göttingen (Germany, 2005–2006). Since 2006 he holds the chair in medieval German literature at the university of Bern. Intermediately, he was guest lecturer in Vienna (Austria, 2001) and Munich (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, 2004) as well as invited professor in Paris (Sorbonne, 2007–2008). Other positions: director of the Parzival Project (www.parzival.unibe.ch, since 2001); president of the Swiss Academic Society of German Studies (2008–2012) and of the Bernese Centre of Medieval Studies (2009–2012); Vice-Dean (2010–2012) and Dean of the Arts and Humanities Faculty of the University of Bern (2012–2014). His research interests include travel literature, Middle High German lyrics and epics, the history of learning and intellectual history, medieval manuscript culture.

 

Selected Publications

  • ‹Tum›-Studien. Zur dichterischen Gestaltung im Marienpreis Heinrichs von Mügeln (Bibliotheca Germanica 36). Tübingen/Basel: Francke 1996 [doctoral thesis].
  • Artes-liberales-Zyklen. Formationen des Wissens in lateinischen und deutschen Text-Bild-Zeugnissen des Mittelalters. 2 Bde. (Bibliotheca Germanica 47,1/2). Tübingen/Basel: Francke 2004 [habilitation thesis].
  • With Adrian Mettauer (edd.): Buchkultur im Mittelalter. Schrift – Bild – Kommunikation. Berlin/New York: de Gruyter 2005.
  • Die St. Galler Nibelungenhandschrift [Epenhandschrift]: Parzival, Nibelungenlied und Klage, Karl, Willehalm. Faksimile des Codex 857 der Stiftsbibliothek St. Gallen und zugehöriger Fragmente. CD-ROM with booklet. Ed. by the Abbey Library of St-Gall and the Parzival-Project. Introduction by M.St. (Codices Electronici Sangallenses 1). 2nd edition, St-Gall: Abbey Library 2005.
  • Chrétiens ›Roman de Perceval ou le Conte du Graal‹ und Wolframs ›Parzival‹. Ihre Überlieferung und textkritische Erschließung, in: Wolframs Parzival-Roman im europäischen Kontext, in Verbindung mit Susanne Köbele und Eckart Conrad Lutz hg. von Klaus Ridder, Berlin: Erich Schmidt 2014 (Wolfram-Studien 23), S. 431–478.

 

FRIAS Research Project

Reading as ‘negotiating’ in the early modern period. The library of Sigismund Gossembrot

Under the impression of the radical changes of reading habits in the digital age, this project studies the reading practices of the humanist Sigismund Gossembrot (1417–1493), a former merchant and mayor of Augsburg, who in 1461 withdrew to Strasburg for spending his time with reading, copying and annotating texts collected in his growing library. Gossembrot’s habitus as umanista come lettore (A. Grafton) is analysed in the context of scholarship and social ‘negotiations’ in the early European Renaissance period. The study will be accompanied by electronic editions re-enacting Gossembrot’s habits of annotating and cross-referencing using digital instruments such as hypertext-links.