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You are here: FRIAS Fellows Fellows 2016/17 Dr. Thomas Mohnike

Dr. Thomas Mohnike

Every year, approximately 50 Fellows are invited to work on their projects at FRIAS for 2 to 12 months in an intellectually stimulating environment. Fellows that have already been at FRIAS before can return to FRIAS for 2 to 6 weeks within the framework of the Alumni Programme, for example in order to finish a project. Furthermore, junior and senior researchers are regularly invited as guest researchers.

Schätz

Our Research Focus profited enormously from the international team of Fellows and guest researchers at FRIAS.

Prof. Dr. Tobias Schätz, ERC Consolidator Grant 2015, Research Focus Quantum Transport 2014/15

University of Strasbourg
Scandinavian Studies
External Senior Fellow
October 2013 - October 2015

CV

Thomas Mohnike is senior lecturer (maître de conférences) and head of the department of Scandinavian studies at the Université de Strasbourg. His research interests include imaginative geographies and geographies of knowledge, focalizing on the use of literature in the making of identity, alterity, and otherness in Scandinavia, including postcolonial perspectives and the history of rewritings of Old Norse sources.

 

Selected Publications

  • Thomas Mohnike: "Frédéric-Guillaume/Friedrich-Wilhelm Bergmann und die Geburt der Skandinavistik in Frankreich aus dem Geiste der vergleichenden Philologie", in Karin Hoff / Udo Schönling / Per Øhrgaard (Hrsg.): Kulturelle Dreiecksbeziehungen. Aspekte der Kulturvermittlung zwischen Frankreich, Deutschland und Dänemark in der ersten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts. Königshauses & Neumann: Würzburg, 2013,à paraitre.
  • Thomas Mohnike: « Géographies du savoir historique : Paul-Henri Mallet entre rêves gothiques, germaniques et celtiques », Schnakenbourg, Eric (éd.) : Figures du Nord. Scandinavie, Groenland et Sibérie. Perceptions et représentations des espaces septentrionaux du Moyen Âge au XVIIIe siècle, Rennes 2012, p. 215-226.
  • Thomas Mohnike: « Eine im Raum verankerte Wissenschaft? Aspekte einer Geschichte der « Abteilung Germanenkunde und Skandinavistik » der Reichsuniversität Strassburg », in: Nordeuropaforum 1-2/2010, p. 63-86.
  • Thomas Mohnike: « Grands courants, grands hommes, grands récits. Structures de la géographie des nations dans l'œuvre de Georg Brandes », in: Bourguignon, Annie; Harrer, Konrad; Stender Claussen, Jørgen (éd.): Grands courants d'échanges intellectuels : Georg Brandes et la France, l'Allemagne et l'Angleterre. Peter Lang: Bern et. al., 2010, S.37-50
  • Thomas Mohnike: ”Imaginierte Geographien. Der schwedischsprachige Reisebericht der 1980er und 1990er Jahre und das Ende des Kalten Krieges”, Ergon-Verlag: Würzburg, 2007.

 

FRIAS Research Project

Building the North with words. Geographies of scientific knowledge in European philologies 1850–1950

The project analyzes the use of the languages, cultures and literatures of Scandinavia in France, Germany and Scandinavia in three developing branches of academic knowledge – comparative philology, literary history and Sami studies – between 1850 and 1950. In these fields, academics depicted the North often either as the home of liberty, the last wilderness, a refugium of melancholy or birthplace of an industrious Germanic warrior culture, that opposed to Southern superficialness and laziness. These imaginative geographies of the North were evidently depending on political contexts and local needs and were not the same in Freiburg, Strasbourg, Copenhagen or Paris. The project proposes to analyze thus 1) the changing and conflicting versions of imaginative geographies that the actors of the field evoked by using Scandinavian literatures and cultures and 2) how these seemingly delocalized scientific models depended on ever different (political, didactic, esthetic, ideological, formal...) local needs and practices – on venues, regions and cultural circulation, to speak with Livingstone. The project proposes thus the first distinctly transnational dynamic geography of scientific knowledge of the North as not only a history of a scientific discourse, but also as a result of doing and performing scientific work.