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Sie sind hier: FRIAS School of History Fellows Prof. Dr. Lucy Riall

Prof. Dr. Lucy Riall

Birkbeck University of London, UK
Fellow
01.09.10-31.08.11

Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS)
School of History

    CV
    Born 1962, 1988 PhD in History at the University of Cambridge; since 1994 Professor in History, Birkbeck University of London; since 2003 Editor, European History Quarterly; 2003-2004 École Normale Supérieure, Paris, France, Professeur invite, Freie Universität, Berlin, Germany Berliner Kolleg für Vergleichende Geschichte Europas, Visiting Professor; 2005-2006 The Leverhulme Trust, Research Fellowship; 2007-2008 Université de Paris Est, France, Professeur invité; since 2007 Member, Faculty of Archaeology, History and Letters, British School at Rome; since 2007 Laboratoire Jean-Baptiste Say, Université de Paris Est, France, Chercheur associé; 2008 The British Academy, Overseas Conference Grant; 2009-2010 Fellowship FRIAS School of History

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    BOOKS

    - The Italian Risorgimento: State, Society and National Unification (London, Routledge, 1994)
    •    Italian translation: Il Risorgimento: storia e interpretazioni (Rome, Donzelli, 1997; second edition 2007)
    •    Romanian translation: Italia în perioda Risorgimento (Bucharest, Editura Artemis, 2001)
    - Sicily and the Unification of Italy: Liberal Policy and Local Power, 1859-1866 (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1998)
    •    Italian translation: La Sicilia e l’unificazione italiana (Turin, Einaudi, 2004)
    - Garibaldi. Invention of a Hero (New Haven & London, Yale University Press, 2007)
    •    Italian translation: Garibaldi. Invenzione di un eroe (Rome & Bari, Laterza, 2007)
    •    Portugese translation forthcoming with EDIPUCRS (Porto Alegre, Brazil)
    - Risorgimento: The History of Italy from Napoleon to Nation State (London, Palgrave, 2009) (revised, rewritten and expanded edition of The Italian Risorgimento)

    ARTICLES AND CHAPTERS

    - ‘“Ill-contrived, badly executed [and] … of no avail”? Reform and its impact in the Sicilian latifondo (c.1770-c.1910)’, in R. Halpern & E. dal Lago (eds), The American South and the Italian Mezzogiorno: Essays in Comparative History (London, Palgrave, 2002), 132-52
    - ‘Elites in search of authority: political power and social order in nineteenth-century Sicily’, History Workshop Journal, 55, 2003, 25-46
    ‘Eroi maschili, virilità e forme della guerra’, in A. Banti & P. Ginsborg (eds), Storia d’Italia. Annali 22. Il Risorgimento (Turin, Einaudi, 2007), 253-88
    - ‘The politics of Italian Romanticism. Mazzini’s making of nationalist culture’, in C. Bayley & E. Biagini (eds), Giuseppe Mazzini and the Globalization of Democratic Nationalism, 1805-2005. Proceedings of the British Academy, 152, (Oxford, OUP, 2008), 167-86
    - ‘Fathers of the nation? Bismarck, Garibaldi and the cult of memory in Germany and Italy’ (with Robert Gerwarth), European History Quarterly 39/3, 2009, 388-413
    - ‘The shallow end of history? On the substance and future of political biography’, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 40/3, 2010, 375-97
    - ‘Martyr-cults in nineteenth-century Italy’, Journal of Modern History, 82, June 2010, 255-87

     

    FRIAS RESEARCH PROJECT

    “Bronte: an Anglo-Italian conflict ( 1799 - c.1940)”

    My current research is on the history of Bronte, a Sicilian town on the slopes of Mount Etna. For over a hundred years, it has been a symbol of modernisation's violent impact on the traditional world of nineteenth-century Italy. The community is notorious for a violent peasant uprising which took place during the unification of Italy in 1860, and for the cruel repression which followed. It is equally well-known for its association with the British naval hero, Lord Nelson, who received the whole place as a gift from the King of Naples in 1799, along with a noble title, the Dukedom of Bronte. Relying on the large archive ammassed by Nelson's descendants (who owned the estate until 1980), I have been able to trace the origins and consequences of the 1860 revolt and to analyse the town's connections to British power and influence.